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Wednesday / 19 June 2024
HomeFeaturesHow much money the new Toyota Hilux Hybrid is saving you in the long run

How much money the new Toyota Hilux Hybrid is saving you in the long run

South Africa’s most popular bakkie is now available with an electrified drivetrain that aims to provide smoother acceleration and better fuel economy over extended periods.

Using the brand’s 2.8-litre, turbo-diesel engine, the Toyota Hilux mild hybrid (MHEV) units are equipped with 48-volt technology that improves their fuel efficiency by roughly 5% compared to their non-electrified equivalents.

This all sounds great, but the catch is that you need to pay more to purchase the MHEV, which raises the question of how much driving you will need to do to start saving money beyond what you had to spend to purchase the assisted powertrain in the first place.

In it for the long haul

The Hilux MHEV series comprises six derivatives, and we compared the cheapest and most expensive options (the Raider and Legend RS) to see how much they will save compared to their standard counterparts.

The following table shows how the 48V units’ consumption compares to the standard models, and how much they will save on diesel after 1,000km.

The fuel cost is calculated based on the current value of diesel 50ppm which is sitting at R22.60 per litre as of April 2024.

Model Claimed fuel consumption Fuel used after 1,000km Fuel cost
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 double cab Raider auto 7.4l/100km 74 litres R1,672.40
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab Raider auto 7.0l/100km 70 litres R1,582.00
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 double cab 4×4 Legend RS auto 8.0l/100km 80 litres R1,808.00
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab 4×4 Legend RS auto 7.6l/100km 76 litres R1,717.60

This equates to an average fuel-saving of R90.40 per 1,000km regardless of the model selected, so the next question is how much more you are spending to pick up the MHEV units.

The price of the units being compared is listed below:

  • Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 double cab Raider auto – R759,300
  • Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab Raider auto – R774,800
  • Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 double cab 4×4 Legend RS auto – R1,011,000
  • Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab 4×4 Legend RS – R1,023,400

With the Raider, you are paying R15,500 more for the hybrid, while the sum is actually a bit less on the Legend RS at a difference of R12,400.

Putting everything together, this is how much driving you will need to do before the savings actually reflect in your wallet:

Model Vehicle price difference Fuel savings per 1,000km Driving distance to break even
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab Raider auto R15,500 R90.40 171,460km
Toyota Hilux 2.8GD-6 48V double cab 4×4 Legend RS auto R12,400 R90.40 137,168km

One thing to bear in mind is that this is likely a worst-case scenario, as hybrids are at their most efficient in short to medium-distance trips around town.

The 48-volt lithium-ion battery and electric motor generator used on the Hilux and Fortuner MHEVs deliver smoother acceleration at low speeds, which allows the revs to climb in a more controlled manner and burn less diesel as a result.

They also have a Stop/Start function and a reduced idle speed of 600rpm instead of 720rpm, which minimizes fuel spend in traffic.

Taking this into consideration means that you will likely see a noticeably better fuel return in an urban setting than with the diesel-only models, which in all likelihood is where most buyers will spend the majority of their time.

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